Request for Proposals – Central Texas African American Healthy Minds Project

African American kid hugging mothers leg

Key Dates
Grants management system (Fluxx) registration deadline 11:59 pm, Central Time (CT), on Monday, November 28, 2022
Proposal Submission Deadline 11:59 am Central Time (CT), on Thursday, December 1, 2022
Award Selection January 2023
Grants Announced, 23rd Central Texas African American Family Support Conference in Austin February 7-8, 2023
Grant Start Date March 1, 2023
Grant End Date February 29, 2024

The Hogg Foundation believes that mental health is not solely an individual responsibility but is a product of community conditions. The places where people live, learn, work, play, and pray can have a significant impact on improving mental health.

With this funding opportunity, the foundation plans to invest $100,000 to award $10,000 each to ten eligible Central Texas organizations who support the mental health and wellness of African Americans. The Central Texas African American Healthy Minds Project focuses on African American school-age children, youth, adults and/or their families. The project seeks proposals that offer education and awareness opportunities, provide resources, services, and support, and/or address the impact of trauma and/or COVID-19.

Questions and Answers

Who is Eligible to Apply?

Eligible organizations include 501(c)(3) nonprofits, community-based organizations or collaboratives including mental health and consumer organizations; student and/or parent organizations; faith-based/religious entities; public libraries; and educational institutions including school districts, colleges, and universities.

Applicants must be Texas-based or have offices, chapters, or affiliates in Central Texas. Preference will be given to organizations led by Black, Indigenous, and other People of Color (BIPOC). The five original counties, eligible since the grant program’s inception, are still eligible to apply and include Travis, Bastrop, Caldwell, Hays, and Williamson.

This year, the foundation is expanding the opportunity to additional rural communities and has increased the number of eligible counties to include several counties listed in the Health and Human Services, Central Texas-Region 7 catchment area. The additional counties eligible to apply for this funding opportunity include the following: Bell, Bexar, Brazos, Burleson, Coryell, Falls, Freestone, Grimes, Guadalupe, Lee, Leon, Limestone, Madison, Milam, Robertson, and Washington. These counties were selected based on their Central Texas location and their percentage of African American populations based on 2021 US Census data.

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Black parents swinging their daughter in the air in an outdoor setting. A visions have while awarding Central Texas African American Healthy Minds grants.Last Year’s Healthy Minds Grant Partners

Meet the ten organizations that were chosen for this special opportunity.

Learn More

Background

The foundation was established in 1940 by the children of former Texas Governor James S. Hogg and is a part of the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement at The University of Texas at Austin. The foundation envisions a future in which the people of Texas thrive in communities that support mental health and well-being.

The Central Texas African American Family Support Conference (CTAAFSC) is the longest standing conference in the country that focuses on mental health and wellness in the African American community. For more than twenty years, the Hogg Foundation for Mental Health has supported Integral Care (previously Austin Travis County Mental Health Mental Retardation) in hosting the Central Texas African American Family Support Conference (CTAAFSC). One of the goals of the CTAAFSC has been to erase stigma, increase access, and raise awareness to educate African Americans in Central Texas about mental health. The conference has proved successful in bridging the gap between the mental health provider community and consumers, youth, and families in need of care, resources, and support.

African American familyOne in four individuals will experience a mental health condition during his or her lifetime. Studies show that though African Americans develop mental health conditions at about the same rate as others, they are much less likely to seek support and care. While about 40 percent of white Americans seek help when experiencing emotional distress, studies show that only about 25 to 30 percent of African Americans do so.

There are several reasons why African Americans don’t seek needed support to address mental health conditions. These include shame and stigma associated with such conditions, lack of knowledge, and misunderstanding about mental health resources, including treatment, support, and where to go when seeking help. People of color in Texas are more likely to be uninsured than their White counterparts, which limits their access to mental health services. In addition, lack of access to and distrust in the health care system, as well as concerns about finding a culturally competent professional who understands trauma, racism, and the impact discrimination has on day-to-day life may also play a role in keeping African Americans from addressing mental health conditions. Consequently, the problems still exist.

As it pertains to African American youth, a recent study in the Journal of Community Healthfound that suicide rates among this population increased significantly between 2001 and 2017. For African American youth ages 13-19, the rate of suicide among girls almost doubled and for boys, the rates rose 60 percent.

The past couple of years have proven to be very challenging, and the mental health impact will be felt for years to come. The COVID-19 pandemic and the economic recession have hit communities of color the hardest. The murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and numerous other BIPOC Americans in 2020 sparked a global outcry against racism and police brutality. The Hogg Foundation for Mental Health declares that racism is not only a public health crisis, but it is also a mental health crisis, and it is about time we named it. Racism is a mental health issue because racism causes trauma. Racial trauma accumulates throughout a person’s life, leading to activation of stress responses and hormonal adaptations increasing the risk of non-communicable diseases and biological ageing. This trauma is also transmitted intergenerationally and affects the offspring of those initially affected through complex biopsychosocial pathways.

Historically, BIPOC-led organizations, trusted and rooted in their communities, address health inequities, and respond to the unique needs and challenges of people of color. Most BIPOC-led organizations have faced structural barriers, limited access to local, state, federal and philanthropic funding opportunities, and have experienced racism firsthand. Despite these challenges, BIPOC-led organizations have still managed to offer culturally responsive programs, resources, and support. Also, some BIPOC-led organizations have developed programs yet lack the funding to launch these programs or increase their service capacity.

The Hogg Foundation for Mental Health will continue our investment as part of the solution through our support of the goals and efforts of the CTAAFSC. This year we are investing $100,000 to award $10,000 each to ten eligible Central Texas organizations. Preference will be given to BIPOC-led organizations who submit proposals that focus on enhancing the mental health and wellness of African Americans in Central Texas through:

  1. Education and awareness opportunities; and/or
  2. Resources, services, and support; and/or
  3. Trauma and/or COVID-19 support.

Proposals will identify the population(s) of focus as one of the following:

  1. African American adults -18 years of age and older; and/or
  2. African American school-age youth/children under 18 years of age and their families.

Three Step Application Process:

Step 1. Registration

The Hogg Foundation uses an online grants management system called Fluxx. Applicants must register before the proposal due date and no later than 11:59 pm, Central Time (CT), on Monday, November 28, 2022. Applicants must have a federal tax identification number and it must be entered to complete the registration process.

If your organization has never used Fluxx before, you will need to register. Follow the instructions on the right-hand side of the screen, then proceed to Step 2.

If an individual with your organization has registered in in the past, go to Fluxx and enter the username and password previously used to confirm your registration, then proceed to Step 2.

If an individual with your organization has a username, but has forgotten their password, please go to Fluxx and follow the instructions on the right-hand side of the screen, then proceed to Step 2.

If you experience technical issues with registering in Fluxx please email grants management staff at hogg-grants@austin.utexas.edu.

Step 2. Enter Proposal Information

The next step is to enter proposal information online into Fluxx. Answers must be provided for all questions to be considered for funding. Applicants will be prompted to answer questions in Fluxx, and the information provided will create your online proposal. All narrative responses must be answered in the open fields in Fluxx in the Grant Proposal Details section.

Applicants will submit answers to the following questions in Fluxx:

About Your Project

Please describe your project idea including:

  1. The method you plan to use:
    1. education and awareness opportunities and/or,
    2. resources, services, and support and/or,
    3. trauma and/or COVID-19 support.
  2. The proposed age group/audience who will benefit from this grant, including race/ethnicity.
  3. The location of the proposed project (e.g., city, county, zip codes, neighborhoods, rural/urban, etc.).
  4. The needs, challenges, and/or opportunities to be addressed by the proposed project.
  5. The reason this project is important to your community.
  6. Other relevant facts and/or information that support the proposed project.

Proposal Goals and Impact

Please describe:

  1. The overall goals of your project.
  2. The impact you hope the project has among the proposed population of focus.
  3. How you will be able to tell whether the project was successful.

Proposal Activities and Costs

Please describe the:

  1. Proposed activities, including type, when, and where the activities will take place.
  2. Current efforts and any relevant history your organization has engaging African Americans.
  3. Estimated costs of proposed activities and items/activities the funds will cover.

Proposed Staff

List all key staff involved in this grant project by clicking the green “plus” button on the right-hand side of the screen.

Letter of Approval to Submit Proposal:

Applicants who are eligible 501(c)(3) organizations or governmental entities must upload in Fluxx, a signed letter of approval on letterhead from the authorized agency representative approving the submission of the proposal.

Applicants affiliated with a higher education institution should submit a signed letter on letterhead from the institution’s grant office (such as Office of Sponsored Projects or Grants and Contracts) either approving the submission of the proposal or stating that such approval is not required. This letter should be uploaded to the Application Documents section under the Required Application Documents section in Fluxx.

Fiscal Documents

Please submit the following in the Application Documents category in Fluxx under the Fiscal Documents section to assist the foundation in assessing the organization’s fiscal soundness:

  1. IRS letter of determination of 501(c)(3) status or tax-exempt status and/or
  2. Church Status Verification Form (if applicable)

Step 3. Proposal Submission

The final step is to submit the completed proposal online. Before submitting, applicants should review the proposal information for completeness, accuracy and to ensure the following information has been submitted:

  • Completed proposal
  • Uploaded Letter of Approval to Submit Proposal
  • Required fiscal documentation

Be sure and follow the instructions to ensure your proposal has been submitted. The proposal must be submitted in Fluxx by December 1, 2022, at 11:59 a.m., Central Time (CT). If you experience technical issues with submitting the proposal, please email grants management staff at hogg-grants@austin.utexas.edu.

Confirmation of Receipt of Proposal

Applicants will receive an automatic email notification to confirm that the proposal has been received. Applicants will be notified if documents submitted were not successfully uploaded or are incomplete and expected to complete the submission immediately.

Have Questions?

In an effort to offer a fair and equitable application process, the foundation does not accept phone calls regarding the request for proposals, except for questions related to technical issues. Questions about the request for proposals may be emailed to hogg-grants@austin.utexas.edu. Answers to questions that may be helpful and relevant to other potential applicants will be posted on this webpage. Check back often for updated questions and answers as well as any additional information about this request for proposals.

Questions and Answers

Review and Selection Process

Immediately following the closing of the request for proposal period, foundation staff will review and rate each proposal. Award selections will be based on the information provided in the proposal narrative and used to determine which are best qualified to complete the proposed projects.

Award Notification

Applicants will be notified, whether selected or not, of the status of their proposals via email in early January 2023.

Reporting and Grant Requirements

The reporting requirements and due dates will be clearly stated in the funding agreement letter between the grant partner and the foundation. Final narrative reports describing the activities and goals accomplished during the designated grant period are requested. Grant partners will receive a narrative report reminder and template prior to the report due date.

Grant partners will be encouraged to be active participants in the Austin Area African American Behavioral Health Network.

 


Questions and Answers

What is Fluxx and can’t we just email our proposal in a Word document to Hogg-grants?

Fluxx is the foundation’s online grants management system where applicants must submit materials. Applicants must first register in Fluxx to apply for a grant. The foundation can only accept proposals completed and submitted via the Fluxx portal.<

Can a church apply for this opportunity, and can you please explain a church verification form?

Yes, a church is eligible to apply for funds offered through this grant opportunity. Churches that meet the requirements of Internal Revenue Service (IRS) section 501(c)(3) are automatically considered tax exempt and are not required to apply for and obtain recognition of tax-exempt status from the IRS. For more information on tax exempt status and churches, download this publication from the IRS site:  Internal: Internal Revenue Service’s Tax Guide for Churches and Religious Organizations. Because this status is awarded automatically, there is no verification resource such as IRS Publication 78, in which we may be assured of the tax-‐exempt status of a church. The church verification form can be found at the bottom of the application in Fluxx under “required documents.”  

Is there going to be a teleconference where applicants can learn more about the RFP?

There will not be a teleconference for this Request for Proposals. Applicants are encouraged to continue checking theses Questions and Answers for updated information. In addition, applicants may email hogg-grants@austin.utexas.eduwith any additional questions.  

Is there a print friendly version of the Request for Proposals (RFP)?

Yes, download a print-friendly version of the Request for Proposals. The information communicated in the print and web versions are identical.    

If an applicant does not have the capacity to manage the finances for this project, can they partner with a separate fiscal agent?

Yes. Applicants must demonstrate organizational capacity to manage a grant award or partner with a fiscal agent to manage the budgetary responsibilities and requirements.  

Can the lead organization have a tax-exempt determination as 170(b) (government entity such as university) as opposed of 501(c)3?

Yes, a lead organization with a tax-exempt determination as 170(b) is also eligible to apply.    

Can you share some examples of how the funds might be used?

Funds might be used for personnel, contractors and/or consultants, meetings and events, travel, special projects, materials and/or supplies. 

The foundation is always somewhat hesitant to give specific examples of funding ideas to not influence proposals or stifle creativity. Applicants should keep in mind the intention of the goals of the initiative. The foundation is seeking proposals that focus on enhancing the mental health and wellness of African Americans in Central Texas through education and awareness opportunities; and/or resources, services, and support. Some examples might include: 

  • A school or university hosts a monthly mental health awareness event and offers food and prizes for participants.  
  • A faith-based organization contracting with local African American clinicians to offer counseling sessions for congregants over the course of the grant term.   
  • Offering radio spots or public service announcements that address stigma and raise awareness about mental health and wellness. 
  • A community organization partnering with a student-led organization to receive curriculum-based education and awareness about suicide prevention to create a supportive peer environment among students.  
  • A church hosts a regularly scheduled event that brings together senior citizens to talk about how aging impacts mental health and wellness.  
  • A women’s support group that focuses on the impact of COVID-19 on their mental health and wellness. 
  • Groups offered to youth to engage and educate about stress, self-esteem, and emotional wellness. 
  • A non-profit organization hosting yoga and mindful activities in the African American community for free.  
  • Recognizing mental health awareness month through outreach and community education. 
  • Hosting support groups for individuals living with mental health conditions. 

Disclaimer: Proposals that include usage of any of the examples above are not more likely to receive funding than those that do not. 

How much detail should the explanation of costs include when estimating use of funds?

The proposals should give the reviewers enough information to determine if the amount requested is in line with the proposed scope of work and activities. Estimated costs might include items intended to purchase and/or costs associated with paying an individual for services delivered, meetings and events or estimated travel. Expenses may also include stipends or honorariums offered to program participants such as; food/meals, gift cards for gas or groceries, etc.  

We are a group of students who have been meeting to discuss mental health and create a more supportive campus environment. We are interested in submitting a proposal, but we are not a 501(c)(3) organization? Can we still apply?

Only 501(c)(3) organizations are eligible to apply for this grant opportunity. An applicant not meeting this requirement might consider talking with an organization or entity (such as a counseling center) in their school or community that is a 501(c)(3) organization or university partner and therefore eligible to receive the funds.   

Please explain why BIPOC led organizations are being given preference and what does that mean?

The Hogg Foundation for Mental Health declares that racism is not only a public health crisis, but it is also a mental health crisis, and it is about time we named it. Racism is a mental health issue because racism causes trauma  

Historically, BIPOC-led organizations, trusted and rooted in their communities, address health inequities and respond to the unique needs and challenges of people of color. Most BIPOC-led organizations have faced structural barriers, limited access to local, state, federal and philanthropic funding opportunities, and experienced racism firsthand. Despite these challenges, BIPOC-led organizations have still managed to offer culturally responsive programs, resources and support. Lastly, some BIPOC-led organizations have developed programs yet lack the funding to launch these programs or increase their service capacity.  

We define BIPOC led as an organization’s executive leadership positions (executive director, chief operating officer, chief executive officer, program directors, etc.) are held by people of color and key decisions are made by those individuals in those positions.  

Our organization has applied for 501(c) (3) but has not received it yet.  Are we still eligible to submit a proposal and receive grant funds if our 501(c) (3) is approved before the funds are awarded?

No, an organization must have a 501(c) (3) status prior to applying for the grant. In addition, respondents must submit the following fiscal documents to assist the foundation in assessing the organization’s fiscal soundness:

  • IRS letter of determination of 501(c) (3) status or tax-exempt status.   
  • Most recent IRS Form 990. 
  • Current operating budget  

Our 501(c) (3) currently has a grant from the Hogg Foundation for another initiative. Are we eligible to apply for this grant opportunity?

Yes, current grantees are eligible to apply for this grant opportunity. 

Can an organization submit more than one proposal?

Yes, an organization may submit more than one proposal.  

Our organization is interested in applying for funds but currently we offer services to mostly Caucasians. Are we eligible to apply for grant funds?

The focus of this grant program is to provide education and awareness about mental health and wellness as well as services, resources and supports to African Americans.  Proposed grant-related activities should describe how they will impact African Americans in all services, outreach, and education efforts.    

This year’s funding seems to be different(more) than in year’s past. Can we only apply for $10,000 and not smaller increments?

The foundation recognizes the impact COVID-19, racism and other inequities have had on BIPOC-led organizations. We chose to increase the funding amounts to show a deeper commitment, recognizing the challenges many BIPOC-led organizations have experienced, especially over the past couple of years. Proposals should include a request for funding only in the amount of $10,000. 

Are there match funds required for the grant?

No, applicants are not required to include match funds to be eligible for consideration.  

What are the reporting requirements for this grant?

The reporting requirements and due dates will be clearly stated in the funding agreement letter between the grantee and the foundation. Grantees will be required to submit a final narrative report describing the activities and goals completed during the designated grant period. Grantees will receive a narrative report reminder and template prior to the report due date.   

We want the identified population of focus to inform us about their needs and recommendations for funding. Can we propose spending funds just for information gathering during the one-year funding period?

No. The proposed activities may initially focus on gathering feedback and planning how the funds will be used once the input is received. However, the planned activities must be completed by the end of the one-year grant term.